Former World No.1 Naomi Osaka showed her class after losing the Miami Masters final and called Iga Swiatek's career "incredible". Swiatek, 20, defeated Osaka 6-4, 6-0 to win her first title in Miami and complete the Sun Double. Swiatek has now played her last 17 matches and has won three consecutive titles. After winning Doha in February, Swiatek won Indian Wells and Miami to complete the Sun Double. On Monday, Swiatek will officially become No.1 in the world for the first time in her career. "I was thinking about when we had dinner in Australia. Seeing your journey is amazing. I hope you continue to have fun," Osaka told Swiatek during the on-court trophy ceremony, according to WTA Insider. After the Indian Wells incident, Osaka started seeing a therapist. In her first tournament since the Indian Wells booing incident, Osaka put on a strong performance by reaching her first final since she won the Australian Open last year. In Miami, Osaka admitted that she was surprised at how quickly everything had settled for her. "I would say yes and no. In a weird way, because I know I told you I talked to a therapist afterwards," Osaka said. "Talking with her helped me a lot. It helped me see things from a different perspective. I told her… I'm not going to tell you what I told her, but, you know, I feel like there are things that can help me and I never realized that." Rafael Nadal suffered a stress fracture to his ribs during the recently-concluded Indian Wells Masters while playing Carlos Alcaraz in the semifinals. Nadal won that match 6-4, 4-6, 6-3 to progress to the finals, where he was beaten by an inspired Taylor Fritz.

Nadal suffered a stress fracture to his ribs

Canadian tennis coach Rob Steckley lauded Rafael Nadal's never-say-die attitude on a recent podcast, highlighting how no barrier is big enough to stop the Spaniard from playing tennis. "Nadal, that guy's (laughs) he seems like he's falling apart but he just never leaves us," Steckley said. "When I was coaching Denis (Shapovalov), we'd always talk about when that guy was ever gonna leave tennis. And he's that guy that literally – there is nothing else for that guy you know. He's got the most money in the world, he's got everything," Steckley added. "And still, that guy will, even with one leg, he's still gonna try to compete and do what he does, so that's also admirable and courageous."



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